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Contact Customer Care:
+632 (907) 3611 or +63 (917) 772 6273
Monday - Friday: 9am - 8pm EST
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Pasig 1605 Philippines
 

LUXURYREVIEW

 

Get to know: Jason Wu and Luxury Fashion

 
 
Get to know: Jason Wu and Luxury Fashion

A Canadian artist and a New York-based fashion designer, Jason Wu got his biggest career mark after getting introduced by Vogue Magazine’s editor-at-large, André Leon Talley to then first lady of the United States, Michelle Obama. Wu designed her dresses on several occasions, including those worn during the first and second inauguration of American President Barack Obama. His early clients also included Ivana Trump, January Jones, and Amber Valletta. In June 2013, Wu was named as the Art Director of German fashion house Hugo Boss overseeing the entire womenswear range.

 
 

 

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Wu launched his line in 2007, fresh out of Parsons without any formal fashion training other than being a dressmaker of dolls. His signature tropes of timeless femininity and refined glamour set him apart from the very start. He admitted to growing up in parallel to his label: “My vision has become clearer and clearer. I know myself so much better now than I did 10 years ago. The direction definitely much more womanly now. I think my concentration, interest, and what I want to design have really grown with me, growing up into my thirties.”

 

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Talking about fashion and many other things, Wu shared, “The speed of fashion is so fast that luxury fashion has slowed down.” To further detail that, here’s what he shared days before the SGFW.

 

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On sticking to his guns

“I’ve definitely taken hints from sport or street, but in my own way. Never in a very literal way. Just wouldn’t feel very right for me. I think the one thing that’s important for a brand is that you have to be very consistent about your message, who you are. That’s what makes you a brand. What I love is beauty, timelessness. I really want to make sure that those are the first qualities that you see with every collection.”

 

On the fashion industry’s need for change

“Everyone now has to change about how they think about clothes, seasons, regionals, because there’s much less of that. And everyone’s seeing the same thing at the same time. The consumers aren’t able to make a lot of their own decisions and they’re getting their information not only from traditional sources — thanks to tech advancement. It’s kind of like a free-for-all game, you know. In that sense, it promotes change for an industry that doesn’t change so much in terms of its model. It has to right now.”

 

On the rise of location-transcending labels

“As Asia is becoming, or is, the most powerful market in the world, there’s going to be a lot of opportunities for Asian designers to come out on top. I was raised in the West, in Canada and then the US, so I had many great opportunities to do what I do. But for this next generation, you don’t necessarily have to be located in New York or Paris or London or Milan. The digital world is so far-reaching now. You can start something and be able to showcase it on Instagram. There are so many brands now coming from non-traditional roots. It’s a great time to be a designer.”

 

On the essence of Instagram fashion critic Diet Prada

Diet Prada is hilarious. I look at their page from time to time. I think they have me on it sometimes, too. It’s funny. I mean, listen, fashion should be fun. Fashion is full of references. I think a lot of younger people don’t really understand the influences that came from a long, long time ago. What they see is probably limited to the last three seasons. Hopefully, with Instagram, people are starting to unearth more and letting people learn more about where the origins of everything are.”

 

On what the declining luxury retail market is missing

“Going back to the roots of what luxury is — rarity, quality, speciality, interesting content and designs, things that not everybody has — that’s what we need to revive it [luxury retail market]. And the interesting thing is, the next big frontier in luxury is going to be led by all niche, independent brands, because people don’t want what everyone else has. I think luxury is going to go from having the must-have thing that everyone has to being something about having what not everyone has. It’s going to be about uniqueness.”

 

On the best lesson a decade of designing taught him

“You never really know at all. Don’t ever think you do. I thought that when I started my business more than 10 years ago, I thought I knew everything. As it turns out, I don’t. I’m still learning everyday. I learn from new obstacles, new opportunities, and that’s why I love what I do. It’s never really the same.”

 

Source: Lifestyle Asia

 
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October 27, 2017  //  0 Comment

 

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